Art

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La Gioconda: mystery, regret and controversy behind the painting
Thursday, November 15TH, 2012 by Anna De Filippo
La Gioconda: mystery, regret and controversy behind the painting   One of the greatest paintings of Italian art is certainly the masterpiece of Leonardo Vinci, La Gioconda. The painting, better known abroad as "Monna Lisa" ("Monna" as the abbreviation for Madonna and corresponding to the current term "woman") is kept in the museum of the Louvre in Paris. This 77 x 53 cm painting is unsigned, but it is sure that the work was painted by the Italian artist Leonardo da Vinci in 1500. However, the artist never considered the work completed and he never gave it to his commissioner; thus has...
Mantegna
Wednesday, August 08TH, 2012 by Glauco
  Probably not as famous as Michelangelo or Leonardo, Andrea Mantegna is just as talented and artistically important for the history of italian art. He lived in the 15th century and he was with no doubt a master of prospective, a constant in his work and a characteristic of his talent, which began to develop at a young age at his adoptive father's workshop. Ironically, there are records of a lawsuit Mantegna filed against him on copyright issues,  proof that such matters, although labeled with different names, were indeed hot topic back then, too.   After spending 6 years at the workshop,...
Renato Guttuso
Friday, August 03TH, 2012 by Glauco
      A true Sicilian, a strong communist, but above all one of the most famous Italian artists of modern times.  Guttuso came from a wealthy upper middle class family, but soon in his life opted for a very radical, left wing political position. He was born in Bagheria, the Sicilian city brought on to the screen by Giuseppe Tornatore's film only a few years ago. Since his youth, art and politics became his companions, but it was his move to Northern Italy, where he got in touch with the vivid, continental artistic and political ideas of the time, that crucially molded his career. The...
MAXXI
Wednesday, July 18TH, 2012 by Anna De Filippo
MAXXI: The First National Museum Dedicated to Architecture in Italy. For those who associate Italy with ancient art and architecture alone, the MAXXI, National Museum of 21st Century Arts, in Rome will come as quite a surprise. The building itself is a revolutionary design by architect Zaha Hadid and it the exhibits it houses are examples of contemporary art and architecture from the 20th and 21st centuries. The MAXXI is not just an innovation in architecture by design but is also, incredibly, the first of Italy's national museums to be dedicated to archaeology.   The Museum Maxxi in...
Monuments Men in Italy
Tuesday, March 06TH, 2012 by admin
The destruction of the Campo Santo in Pisa brought tears to Deane Keller's eyes. Pieces of the famous frescoes lay on the floor and the roof had been torn off by Allied bombing. Painstakingly, he started picking up fragments of the frescoes and deciding how the restoration work should be carried out. Deane Keller, who had studied art in Italy, was one of the monuments men who helped to save and restore Italian art during World War Two after the Allies landed in the country. These courageous men and women worked with Italian government ministers and museum curators, saving art from German...
La Maiolica:
Saturday, August 13TH, 2011 by Anna De Filippo
La Maiolica: Sicily's Ceramics While the true origins of ceramic are oft debated and still unknown, we can say with certainty that the traditional maiolica style of ceramics is a style born in Sicily that is now renowned the world over. An Old Tradition Ceramics appeared for the first time in Sicily in the 6thcentury B.C. At this time ceramic pieces were used for functional reasons and appeared in simple shapes that only later acquired decoration and quality, losing impurities and imperfections along the way. From the 3rd to the 2nd centuries B.C. settlers in Sicily from central Europe...
Boccioni
Monday, August 08TH, 2011 by Glauco
  Boccioni Umberto Boccioni is one of the most recognized Italian painters of the 20th century and his work is highly appreciated by critics. He was a "Futurist" and probably the most recognized name of the movement that, at the beginning of the  20th century, created a completely new vision of art in Italy. The fortune of Umberto Boccioni was with no doubts the opportunity to travel and live all over Italy since a very young age, and consequently to be exposed to other contemporary painters, all while attending some great schools. In Catania, he would actually obtain his diploma and then...
Il Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Chiusi is a museum of great significance for the town and it's surrounding area, which is known as ancient Etruria. Chiusi (Clevsin in Etruscan) together with eleven other towns and cities of Tuscany are steeped in Etruscan history dating back to between the 9th and 1st century BC. Many Etruscan tombs and settlements have been discovered over the years which contain amazingly well-preserved items that have since been conserved by the museum and are now displayed in behind spotlessly clean glass. There is plenty to see inside this splendid building, built at...
Canova
Monday, April 18TH, 2011 by Glauco
Canova self-portraitCanova was an artist heavily influenced by the classical style of the ancient Greeks despite living in more modern times (1757-1822), and was able to merge this classicism with styles more typical to his own era. Originally from the north east of Italy, Canova artistically grew up in Venice. While still very young Canova decided to move to Rome, then capital of Italian art. The city was also a great place for inspiration: the great work of Bellini, who was widely admired by Canova, provided to the younger artist a true creative example. The artist also owed a debt of...
Jack Vettriano
Thursday, April 14TH, 2011 by Glauco
Singing Butler Jack Vettriano is a remarkably inspired and accomplished contemporary artist of Italian and Scottish descent. Vettriano is known for his gentle touch and somehow surreal, but elegant use of color and the overall ambience in his work. Although Vettriano did not have an artistic background, he began painting in his spare time and with dedication and talent made his hobby into a career. The artist's original work is highly priced, and the reproductions of it generate a steady and solid income through royalties, a modern cash revenue that his classical fellow painters didn't have...

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