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Italian traditional masks for Carnival
Thursday, February 20TH, 2014 by Anna De Filippo
  During  Carnival, our traditional masks become protagonists. Everyone loves them: tourists, adults, teenagers and children. In fact, wearing Carnival costumes and masks is a tradition truly embraced by all, regardless of their age. In the last few years, Carnival has been more and more about dressing up like celebrities, politicians and cartoon characters, but our very own traditional Italian masks, everlasting and always recognizable, are the true essence of Carnival itself, as they have been representing this time of the year for centuries. Here are some of the most famous!  ...
Italian Surnames
Tuesday, October 30TH, 2012 by Anna De Filippo
Italian Surnames Names are important because they identify people, and surnames are doubly important because they also tell of the origins and history of a family through the centuries. In fact, researching your surname, also known as last names or family names, is an exciting way to learn more about your family history. When researching Italian surnames you will quickly find that each family name was created for a particular purpose. Italy has always been known for its lively and extraordinary land and people, and Italian names exhibit these same qualities. Some surnames are widespread...
Pulcinella
Wednesday, February 15TH, 2012 by Anna De Filippo
Pulcinella: a cultural character behind the Carnival mask Carnival is the Italian celebration of fancy dressing, fun and tricks, following the famous saying "A carnevale ogni scherzo vale" (At Carnival, every prank goes). Everybody, young and old alike, decides to wear a costume and hide their face behind a mask. Although it is frequent, nowadays, to dress up as modern celebrities and politicians, Italian culture is famously rich in historical masks that have become real characters reflecting popular and cultural traditions. Pulcinella is probably the most famous of them all.  ...
San Gennaro: A Traditional Catholic Neapolitan Feast
Wednesday, September 28TH, 2011 by Anna De Filippo
San Gennaro: A Traditional Catholic Neapolitan Feast   If you go to Naples on September 19th you will find a huge crowd of people celebrating the day of San Gennaro, a bishop and a martyr from Pozzuoli, canonized by the Catholic Church. This day is extremely important to Neapolitans, as San Gennaro is the patron saint of the city. The feast of San Gennaro involves prayer, processions and celebrations, and is usually based around a fixed program held in the Duomo of Naples. One of the most important events is linked to an emotional ritual, rich in hope and devotion: the liquefaction of the...
Days of wine and roses
Monday, June 27TH, 2011 by admin
By Gina Paone Kulch-Stritch     Often Italian-American culture is portrayed in a stereotypical light. Current examples of this are evident in reality television programs. While there can be truth in stereotypes the Italian-American takes a hard hit. There is no need to go back to the Renaissance to illustrate the creative genius of Italians and Italian-Americans. Carlo Levi's 1930s masterpiece Christ Stopped at Eboli (Cristo si è fermato a Eboli) is a literary gem that was made into an exquisite film. Since the largest percentage of Italian-Americans are from south of Rome, and the film...
La Festa dei Nonni: Grandparents' Day
Wednesday, June 08TH, 2011 by Anna De Filippo
Parents may be the most important people in our lives, but certainly grandparents are no less so. Grandparents are a family's history, and through them a family's origins are handed down to new generations. Cakes cooked together, experiences and stories told near a fireplace, holidays together...these are only some of the things usually shared with grandparents that grandchildren will always remember and perhaps will in turn pass on to their own future grandchildren. The important role grandparents play in a family should always be recognized. That is why Italy decided to create a special day...
Italian American War Heroes
Tuesday, December 28TH, 2010 by Glauco
Sgt. John Basilone (Photo from Wikipedia) The relationship between Italy and war is complicated. To understand it one not only needs to understand current events, but history in general. In past decades Italian immigrants to the United States faced different situations than they would today and had to deal with integrating into a society that had different motivations and values. In cases like World War II, many Italian-Americans had to face fighting against their own roots. Italians  are quite specific about what, exactly, is worth dying for. From the times of the Romans to World War I many...
Famous Italian-American Entrepreneurs
Monday, January 25TH, 2010 by ancos
Gil Amelio - Photo courtesy of globalnerdy.com Italian-Americans have made their mark on the business scene in America since their arrival in the late 19th century. From Gil Amelio, former CEO of Apple and National Semiconductor to Samuel DiPiazza, the current CEO of Pricewaterhousecoopers, it is a long list, which just goes to show the entrepreneurial spirit of Italian-Americans.      Banking and Finance We would probably never have gotten our paycheck had it not been for Blasé Thomas Golisano who founded Paychex, the second biggest processor for payrolls within the US. He also co-owns...
Famous Italian American Architects
Monday, January 25TH, 2010 by ancos
  Romaldo Giurgola - Photo courtesy of iltaccoditalia.info   Many of America's most beautiful buildings are a result of the creativity and tireless efforts of Italian American architects. Who can forget the influence that Mario Joseph Ciampi had on buildings and public spaces in San Francisco's Bay Area? Or the genius of Romaldo Giurgola, instrumental in the designs of buildings like the Lang Music Building, United Fund Headquarters Building, Penn Mutual Tower and the INA Tower? Then there is Thom Mayne, recipient of the Pritzker Prize, Brunner Prize and the Edward MacDowell Medal.  ...
Italian Heritage
Monday, January 11TH, 2010 by admin
O SOLE MIOOOOOOOOOOOOOO .... STA 'NFRONTE A TTEEEEE'................ Italians emigrants During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, thousands and thousands of Italians (mostly from the south) left their homeland to find a better life across the sea in the Americas. Many found their way to the ports of New Orleans, Philadelphia, Boston, and especially New York, where they immediately sought  for their Italian brethren. Eventually, these enclaves became full-fledged communities as colorful as San Francisco's North Beach, Boston's North End and New York's Little Italy, among others....

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