Grammar

Term quicktab

The absence of a neutral use of 'you' in Italian
Thursday, January 26TH, 2012 by Anna De Filippo
The absence of a neutral use of 'you' in Italian   By comparing Italian and English we can detect a difference in the use of pronouns. If English recurs to a neutral use of  the pronoun 'you', which is chosen for both  the second person singular and plural, Italian requires different pronouns, depending on the addressee. The single word 'you' has two main translations in Italian: tu and voi. However, there is a third option used in a formal context to mark the distance between the speaker and the listener. The use of tu, voi and lei The pronoun tu is used in Italian when addressing a...
Adverbs Used to Talk About Time in Italian
Thursday, December 09TH, 2010 by gorizia63
Learn Some Important Adverbs to Help You Discuss Time in Italy   When learning about how to speak about "the time" in Italian we must first look at the adverbs that are linked to such discussions. An adverb is the invariable part of speech that determines, changes or modifies the meaning of the verb to which it refers. The name adverb comes from the Latin "adverbium" which means close to the verb or to the word. Adverbs of time are used to indicate the period of time in which certain actions take place and they answer the question Quando? - DA quando? (When? Since when?) Here below some...
Adjectives describe, qualify or modify nouns and pronouns. They can also be descriptive when describing the noun in detail by assigning an attribute to that noun. In English adjectives generally come before the noun they modify, in Italian they come after. In Italian the adjective and noun must also have to agree in number and gender. Adjectives precede the noun when the adjectives indicate a valuation, impression or a judgment of the speaker. These are known as accessory adjectives (words like “beautiful,” “thin,” and “large,” etc.) If you ask yourself how/what (com’e) something is you...
Italian Grammar
Thursday, July 29TH, 2010 by admin
Mp3 Audio:  It look's like you don't have Adobe Flash Player installed. Get it now.Frasi di aiuto - Help Learning Italian Grammatica italiana: La grammatica è il sistema in cui è organizzata una lingua e senza la quale la lingua sarebbe in uno stato di confusione totale. La grammatica italiana si è evoluta dal latino fino ai nostri giorni ed è importante impararla per essere in grado di comunicare con gli altri. Questa sezione spiega una parte fondamentale della grammatica nella sua forma più semplice e farla diventare una...
Prepositions of Place in Italian
Saturday, July 10TH, 2010 by gorizia63
    Summer is here and many people find themselves travelling from place to place. If you’re trying to describe your movements in Italian then it’s important to know all about prepositions of place. The words listed above are all examples of prepositions in Italian that indicate location—where a person, place or thing is or where the noun is going. When considering these prepositions we have to ask: Dove? Where? IN = It is used to speak about places, countries or regions. The complement di stato in luogo indicates where the subject is and accompanies an action. It is dependent on...
Complements in Italian Grammar
Thursday, June 24TH, 2010 by gorizia63
Complements in Italian can be a bit tricky for those learning the language. Several verbs in English that require complements after them don't in Italian and vice versa. Complements are generally used in a sentence to provide additional information to the listener or reader. It is an element of the proposition or sentence that complete or modifies the meaning of other elements, indicating different circumstances. Complements can be used with a verb, noun or adjective. Some examples of complements used in a sentence:   Il contadino coltiva la terra = The farmer tills the soil = Il contadino...
Interrogative Pronouns in Italian
Wednesday, June 16TH, 2010 by gorizia63
Chi, Che, Quale, Quanto In Italian, as in English, we use an interrogative pronoun to introduce a question. Examples of these are: About person: CHI?  =  Who? (invariable, subject and complement) About things: CHE?  = What? (invariable, subject and complement that corresponds to "che cosa?") Note: Often in spoken Italian we only use "cosa" as in "Cosa stai facendo?" or "What are you doing?" rather than "Che cosa stai facendo?" About quality: QUALE-I? = Which? (For questions relating to quality, identity or to someone or something.) About quantity: QUANTO-A-E-I? = How much? / How many...
Demonstrative Pronouns/Adjectives
Saturday, June 12TH, 2010 by gorizia63
A pronoun is a variable part of speech that replaces a noun. (Noun = a person, place or thing). Pronouns like "he," "which" or "you" are used to make sentences simpler and less repetitive. An adjective is a variable part of speech used to modify or describe nouns. Demonstrative pronouns and adjectives indicate or point to a noun or pronoun, relating them in space and time. For example, in English "this" and "these" refer to nouns that are close in time or space while "those" and "that" indicate nouns that are farther away.   Questo (=this/this one) is masculine singular. The plural is...
Possessive pronouns and adjectives are used in both English and Italian to indicate the ownership of a noun. Possessive pronouns express a relation between a noun and who possesses it, and are used alone, in the place of the noun. The six possessive pronouns in Italian all refer to a person/people. Possessive adjectives in Italian correspond to the English words "my," "your," "its," "his," "her," "their" and "our." Both possessive pronouns and adjectives and generally used in compound forms with the pronoun or adjective coming after a definite article that is not translated in English (ie...
Relative Pronouns in Italian
Friday, May 28TH, 2010 by gorizia63
  A relative pronoun links two clauses, a dependent proposition to a previous proposition, taking the place of a name or a thing and establishing a relationship between the two. The relative pronoun, in referring to a person, place or thing, is used to avoid repetition. In English, relative pronouns are who, whom, which, whose, and that. In spoken English the relative pronoun is often missed, so for many Italian can be hard to learn and understand. Take this example, for instance: "That is a cake. Carla cooked that cake for her friends." = "That is the cake that Carla cooked for her...

Pages