Italian-movies

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Italian Comedies
Saturday, March 01TH, 2014 by admin
  I believe Italian movies are essential to understand how Italians live life. La commedia all' Italiana shows Italy in its most typical behaviours and attitudes, at times bringing them to the extreme, yet always with a touch of irony and a lot of poetic flair.   Read our intro about the commedia all'Italiana here:  Italian Comedies In the next few paragraphs we'll give you an insight into some of the best known -and loved- of all Italian commedie. Each of them is throughouly related to the times it was filmed and offers a true mirror to  life in Italy  in those years: for some Italians,...
Italians that Have Won an Oscar
Monday, September 23TH, 2013 by Glauco
We've compiled a list of some of the talented Italians who have won the Academy Awards over the years: Best Director: Frank Capra, although he would go on to become an American citizen, was born in Italy. The director won Academy Awards for such classics as "It Happened One Night," 1934; "Mr. Deeds Goes to Town," 1936'; and "You Can't Take It With You," 1938. Bernardo Bertolucci - "The last Emperor," 1987.   Best Actor in a Leading Role: Roberto Benigni - "Life is Beautiful," 1998.   Best Actress in a Leading Role: Anna Magnani - "The Rose Tattoo," 1955. Sophia Loren - "Two Women," 1961.  ...
Italian Films that won an Oscar
Tuesday, July 17TH, 2012 by Glauco
      Italy is a country that historically has given a lot to the art of filmmaking and Americans have always been fascinated by "Cinema Italiano", finding it inspiring and its craftsmanship unique. Of course, the Academy has also been very receptive to the films produced by Italy and indeed, as of 2011, Italy is the country that has won more Oscars for best foreign film than any other, a total of 10 Academy awards for best picture and 3 honorary awards.   Let's see in detail which films, their directors and the year they won:   The three honorary awards went to "Shoeshine" (Sciuscia...
Giovanna Mezzogiorno
Friday, June 03TH, 2011 by admin
Giovanna Mezzogiorno Italy had excellent actresses in the past, from the legendary Anna Magnani to Monica Vitti, but for a while the talented actress arena was pretty empty. Have you ever dreamt to get one special wish granted by a genie, something on the lines of  'you can marry whoever you want'?. Well, if such a thing were to happen, Giovanna Mezzogiorno would probably be my first choice (sorry Giovanna!).  Giovanna Mezzogiono, together with Margherita Buy and Asia Argento, is one of my favourite Italian actresses, so we have to dedicate at least an article to her achievements. The...
10 Movie and TV moments featuring Italian cars
Saturday, January 01TH, 2011 by Glauco
Poster of "The Graduate" Italian movies from the 50s & the 60s Clearly, Italian films of that period featured many Italian cars, and represent a true archive of classic models, which have become highly collectable. They are a great way to see them in motion today, when it became almost impossible to see them on the road.   Il Sorpasso (The Easy Life) This is probably one of the best films ever made, and surely one of the best Italy has produced. An extraordinary chemistry among the three leads Vittorio Gassman, Jean-Louis Trintignant and a very young, beautiful Catherine Spaak brings...
Film dubbing
Wednesday, December 22TH, 2010 by Glauco
Woody Allen Voice: Oreste Lionello Italy has a long and strong tradition in film dubbing and lip syncing, to the point that it has probably developed the most important class of "dubbers" in the world. It all started with the first Italian films, where expressive actors who were not blessed with particularly captivating voices were dubbed by others, to the point often the lines of the script were not even actually spoken during filming. Foreign films of course were also translated and dubbed, as subtitles were not really appreciated, despite being used by distribution companies. This allowed...
Italian cinema between the World Wars
Tuesday, October 05TH, 2010 by ancos
Scene from Thais Italy was the first country to create an avant-garde movement in film, Futurism. The Manifesto of Futurist cinema dates back to 1916 (though some experiments were occurring before then) and was signed by, among others, Filippo Marinetti, Armando Ginna, Bruno Corra, Giacomo Balla, and other notable members of the Futurists movement. The Manifesto claimed that cinema was "by nature" a futurist art, thanks to the lack of a past and traditions, but the signers did not like narrative cinema; instead they wanted movies about travel, hunting and wars, and full of quick action. In...
Italian B Movies
Friday, October 01TH, 2010 by admin
The so-called B movies of 1960s and 1970s Italian cinema have recently seen a revival, thanks largely to Quentin Tarantino and our culture's post-modern tendency of digging out all that is old--especially the trashy--and making it new again. In fact, the trashier the better. In the 1980s, when the future director of Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Fiction was still working in a video store, he stumbled upon a number of films by the Italian director Fernando Di Leo.  How those movies made it to a video store in Santa Monica in the middle of the 1980s remains a mystery, as by then Di Leo was a...
Cinepanettoni: Italian Christmas Comedy Movies
Wednesday, September 29TH, 2010 by ancos
Italian Cinema: Vacanze di Natale It all began in 1983 with Vacanze di Natale (Christmas Holidays), a comedy by Italian directors and screenwriters Carlo and Enrico Vanzina. The movie reunited most of the actors who played in the successful movies Sapore di Mare (Taste of the Sea, 1982) and Sapore di Mare 2 - Un Anno Dopo (Taste of the Sea 2 - One Year Later, 1983). The two romantic comedies were set in 1960s Italy amidst the economic boom of the time and played heavily on the nostalgia card. These films were aimed squarely at the Baby Boomers, who were teenagers in the 60s. On the other...
The Muccino Brothers
Saturday, September 25TH, 2010 by ancos
The Muccino brothers: Gabriele (left) and Silvio (right) To many it may seem like the Golden Age of Italian cinema has passed, especially if the yardstick by which greatness is measured is participation in and relevance to international projects and markets. The time of actors like Sophia Loren and Marcello Mastroianni and the great directors like Federico Fellini has passed, but the love they receive from Italians and those around the world lives on. Roberto Benigni, Oscar-winner for Life is Beautiful (a statuette presented to him by the ageless Loren) then marked a brief resurgence of...

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