Cinema Italiano

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Italian Comedies
Saturday, March 01TH, 2014 by admin
  I believe Italian movies are essential to understand how Italians live life. La commedia all' Italiana shows Italy in its most typical behaviours and attitudes, at times bringing them to the extreme, yet always with a touch of irony and a lot of poetic flair.   Read our intro about the commedia all'Italiana here:  Italian Comedies In the next few paragraphs we'll give you an insight into some of the best known -and loved- of all Italian commedie. Each of them is throughouly related to the times it was filmed and offers a true mirror to  life in Italy  in those years: for some Italians,...
Italian Films that Won an Academy Award
Monday, July 18TH, 2011 by Glauco
HIstorically, Italy has given a lot to the art of filmmaking, and Americans have always been fascinated by the Cinema Italiano (Italian cinema), finding it inspiring and unique. Of course, the Academy has also been very sensitive to the films produced in Italy and, indeed, as today, Italy is the foreign country that has won more Oscars for best foreign film than any other, with a total of ten Academy Awards for Best Foreign Films and three honorary awards. Let's take a look at these films, their directors and the years in which they won: 1947 Shoeshine (Sciuscia) and 1949 The Bicycles'...
Film dubbing
Wednesday, December 22TH, 2010 by Glauco
Woody Allen Voice: Oreste Lionello Italy has a long and strong tradition in film dubbing and lip syncing, to the point that it has probably developed the most important class of "dubbers" in the world. It all started with the first Italian films, where expressive actors who were not blessed with particularly captivating voices were dubbed by others, to the point often the lines of the script were not even actually spoken during filming. Foreign films of course were also translated and dubbed, as subtitles were not really appreciated, despite being used by distribution companies. This allowed...
Italian Neorealism
Saturday, October 16TH, 2010 by teresa_cutler
Italian Neorealism   Neorealim: Ladri di Biciclette Before the end of World War II and the fall of Mussolini's Fascist regime a different genre of Italian cinema emerged called Neorealism. The movement began in 1942 and took off in 1943. When the war ended Italy did not simply bounce back with years of economic depression and hardship. Neorealism was a reflection of the time with its depiction of post-war years the genre would dominate Italian cinema for almost ten years, as well as influence film styles throughout the world. Neorealism was a blend of traditional and new techniques, ...
The era of Italian comedy
Friday, October 15TH, 2010 by ancos
  Italian Comedy emerged in Italy in the second half of the 1950s and later developed in the 1960s and ‘70s. It indicated a happy period when Italy produced many different kinds of comedy, all sharing common features such as satire, bourgeois settings, and characterized by a bittersweet approach to story telling. Comedies before the 1950s were light and disengaged from the social reality, or part of the Pink neorealism movement which explored shifting social, cultural, and sexual ideals in a changing post-war Italy. Italian Comedy took up where that movement left off and took inspiration...
Italian cinema between the World Wars
Tuesday, October 05TH, 2010 by ancos
Scene from Thais Italy was the first country to create an avant-garde movement in film, Futurism. The Manifesto of Futurist cinema dates back to 1916 (though some experiments were occurring before then) and was signed by, among others, Filippo Marinetti, Armando Ginna, Bruno Corra, Giacomo Balla, and other notable members of the Futurists movement. The Manifesto claimed that cinema was "by nature" a futurist art, thanks to the lack of a past and traditions, but the signers did not like narrative cinema; instead they wanted movies about travel, hunting and wars, and full of quick action. In...
Italian B Movies
Friday, October 01TH, 2010 by admin
The so-called B movies of 1960s and 1970s Italian cinema have recently seen a revival, thanks largely to Quentin Tarantino and our culture's post-modern tendency of digging out all that is old--especially the trashy--and making it new again. In fact, the trashier the better. In the 1980s, when the future director of Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Fiction was still working in a video store, he stumbled upon a number of films by the Italian director Fernando Di Leo.  How those movies made it to a video store in Santa Monica in the middle of the 1980s remains a mystery, as by then Di Leo was a...
The origins of Italian cinema
Friday, October 01TH, 2010 by ancos
Moloch's Temple in Cabiria (from Wikipedia)   Like many other countries, the first films Italy produced were documentaries. Unlike today's, they were only a few seconds long and filmed with a simple camera; the subject matter was the news and celebrities of their time, mostly kings, emperors and popes. An early pioneer was Filoteo Alberini, an ex-cartographer of the Military Geographic Institute of Florence. The first Italian movie whose title is known is dated 1896 and tells the visit of the King and Queen in Florence. Unfortunately, most of the film has been lost; the fragments we still...
Cinepanettoni: Italian Christmas Comedy Movies
Wednesday, September 29TH, 2010 by ancos
Italian Cinema: Vacanze di Natale It all began in 1983 with Vacanze di Natale (Christmas Holidays), a comedy by Italian directors and screenwriters Carlo and Enrico Vanzina. The movie reunited most of the actors who played in the successful movies Sapore di Mare (Taste of the Sea, 1982) and Sapore di Mare 2 - Un Anno Dopo (Taste of the Sea 2 - One Year Later, 1983). The two romantic comedies were set in 1960s Italy amidst the economic boom of the time and played heavily on the nostalgia card. These films were aimed squarely at the Baby Boomers, who were teenagers in the 60s. On the other...
Sandra Mondaini and Raimondo Vianello
Tuesday, September 28TH, 2010 by ancos
Raimondo Vianello and Sandra Mondaini at their Wedding (Photo from Wikipedia) When iconic Italian actress and showgirl Sandra Mondaini died on September 21, 2010, at age 79, the majority of Italians were saddened, but not many were surprised. Seeing Mondaini at the funeral of husband Raimondo Vianello, dead at 87 just five months earlier, it was clear how much of a toll the loss of her beloved had taken on the actress. The love and bond between the two proved too strong and the actress soon followed the husband she had met in 1958 and married in 1962. Most showbiz couples don't last, but...

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