Directors

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Mario Monicelli
Thursday, February 24TH, 2011 by Glauco
Mario Monicelli (Photo from Wikipedia) Mario Monicelli was a film director who, more than anyone else, was able to capture the true spirit of the Italian comedy on the silver screen, especially in the 1950s and 60s. His movies reflect how things really were, and he created characters whose actions could have been those of your next-door neighbor. In fact, the lifestyle and values that shaped a nation could be found in his films. Monicelli was born in Tuscany and always maintained the rural, leftist attitudes very common in that part of Italy. He started working as a director right in the...
Francis Ford Coppola
Monday, January 24TH, 2011 by Glauco
Francis Ford Coppola (Photo from Wikipedia) When you are director of films like The Godfather and Apocalypse Now your work and reputation pretty much speak for themselves. Francis Ford Coppola is one of the most famous moviemakers of his time, a man who has been able to keep artistic integrity while creating movies that are also commercially successful. From Coppola's early work--like The Conversation--to his masterpiece, The Godfather, a movie he was called in to direct after writing the Oscar-winning script for Patton, all his works represent an amazing artistic effort. During the shooting...
The Muccino Brothers
Saturday, September 25TH, 2010 by ancos
The Muccino brothers: Gabriele (left) and Silvio (right) To many it may seem like the Golden Age of Italian cinema has passed, especially if the yardstick by which greatness is measured is participation in and relevance to international projects and markets. The time of actors like Sophia Loren and Marcello Mastroianni and the great directors like Federico Fellini has passed, but the love they receive from Italians and those around the world lives on. Roberto Benigni, Oscar-winner for Life is Beautiful (a statuette presented to him by the ageless Loren) then marked a brief resurgence of...
The 'Theorem' of Pier Paolo Pasolini's Death
Wednesday, September 01TH, 2010 by admin
A murder, an unsolved mystery and a book are all part of an event that still endures in the minds of Italians. From the 14th of October, the Barbican Theatre will host a new controversial staging of a classical European literary work. Based on the work of the Italian writer, director and philosopher Pier Paolo Pasolini, T.E.O.R.E.M.A.T is the latest play created by the multi-award winning Polish director Grzegorz Jarzyna and his company T.R.Warszawa. Sound take over words in the poetical scenes in this theater re-adaptation of Pasolini's 1968 most evocative movie Teorema (Theorem).At the...
Famous Italian American Directors
Monday, January 25TH, 2010 by ancos
The fingerprints of Italian-Americans can be seen all over Hollywood's greatest modern masterpieces. They are actors, producers, screenwriters and, quite notably, directors. Names like Scorsese, Coppola and Tarantino are often bandied about when speaking about the greatest directors of their generations and all are of Italian heritage. Following in the footsteps of greats like Frank Capra (It's A Wonderful Life) these directors have brought their unique visions and life experiences to the silver screen and enhanced the profiles of Italian-Americans at the same time.   Martin Scorsese - The...
Mario Bava
Wednesday, September 10TH, 2008 by admin
Mario Bava's Biography & Filmography Mario Bava was born on July 31, 1914 in San Remo, Italy. His birth occurred only one day after Germany declared war on France and Russia after the assassination of the Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria; thus, beginning World War I. His father, Eugenio Bava, was a cinematographer and technician during for silent films. Mario originally studied to be a painter; but, the lure of the film industry was very magnetic. He began his career during the 1930s and assisted his father much like his son would later do for him. Throughout the next two decades,...
Dario Argento
Wednesday, September 10TH, 2008 by admin
Dario Argento - The Hitchcock of Giallo Part II Dario Argento with daughter Asia By 1985, the Dario/Daria relationship was winding down. That year saw the release of Phenomena (US Title - Creepers). This was the debut film of the young, future Oscar-winner, Jennifer Connelly. She played a girl named Jennifer who is the daughter of a Hollywood heavyweight. She is sent to a Swiss boarding school in which mysterious murders are taking place. She must use her intuitive ties to insects and an entomologist to solve the mystery before more people die a gruesome death. The film also features...
Dario Argento
Wednesday, September 10TH, 2008 by admin
Dario Argento - The Hitchcock of Giallo Part I Dario ArgentoDario Argento was born on September 7, 1940 in Rome, Italy. His father was the film producer, Salvatore Argento, and his mother was a fashion model named Elda Luxardo. Although many people may believe otherwise due to Dario's stance as the disputed master of Italian horror films, it appears that his childhood was normal. Young Dario did seem to take an interest in the dark literary works of Edgar Allen Poe and the Brothers' Grimm, however. During high school, while enrolled in a Catholic academy, the intelligent young man, who, by...
Fellini - The Italian Cinematic Master
Wednesday, September 10TH, 2008 by admin
The Filmography of Federico Fellini - The Italian Cinematic Master Luci del varieta Variety Lights1950 Fellini's debut film (co-directed with Alberto Lattuada) tells the story of a lovely young lady who talks her way into a job dancing with a bawdy music hall dance troupe. She quickly becomes the star of the show and embarks on a romance with the troupe's aging manager. Lo sceicco bianco The White Sheik 1952 Fellini's first solo directing debut is a comedy that has all the earmarks of his quirky imagination. A honeymooning couple becomes separated on their trip to Rome, which they...
Sergio Leone
Wednesday, September 10TH, 2008 by admin
Italy's Gift to World Cinema Sergio Leone is in many ways the least typical of Italian film directors. Leone was born in Rome in 1929, and began his career doing biblical-era epics. His first great film was a remake of the Japanese director Akira Kurosawa's film, Yojimbo. Leone's film, released in 1964, was named A Fistful of Dollars. The film would contain many of the hallmarks of Leone's early work. It enlisted the help of Leone's lifelong collaborator, the peerless music composer, Ennio Morricone. The film was also the first in which Leone utilized the laconic Hollywood refuge, Clint...

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